Why RCTs? Part 6

How helpful is that Head Start?

lady_bird_johnson_visiting_a_classroom_for_project_head_start_1966

Lady Bird Johnson Visiting a Classroom for Project Head Start, 1966

Education reform is tricky no matter the level or issue targeted. But one area of reform subject to fairly constant momentum is Head Start, especially under the Obama Administration. This program, established in 1965, addresses some of the early developmental and school readiness gaps for low-income children, from birth to age five. The million-dollar question (for a many million-dollar program) is: does it work?

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Reimagining Reversals

Beyond the extraordinary “Why RCTs?” examples

If you’ve been following our “Why RCTs?” series, you’ve read about some drastic examples across several fields of study- many in the medical field- where RCTs have turned common knowledge and practices upside down. These examples are meant to be shocking; they show us the very real and serious implications that can follow from not testing interventions at all or with non-randomized interventions. The accounts I’ve highlighted in the series illustrate several things:

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The Rise of Experimental Methods in the Law

Greetings from Indianapolis and the National Legal Aid and Defender Association (NLADA) annual conference! The proceedings have gathered many of the best minds and providers in the legal services field. There is real momentum for collecting data, making use of promising technologies, and implementing evidence-based practices. All great news for the A2J Lab.

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Who shall receive legal services when not all can?

Triage and Justice for All, Pt. 2

As Erika discussed in a previous blog post, triage is integral to the delivery of legal services, and yet there is no research that demonstrates how to triage well in law.  Triage is always important (because resources are always finite).  But it is absolutely critical when resources are scare and stakes are high.  Decades ago, James F. Childress, in the provocatively titled “Who shall live when not all can live,” laid out the moral and logical arguments for different conceptualizations of triage.

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